Author Posts

March 22, 2017 at 2:32 pm

I read this article in the Washington Post the other day.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/how-i-discovered-an-important-question-a-doctor-should-ask-a-patient/2015/03/09/ca350634-bb9c-11e4-bdfa-b8e8f594e6ee_story.html?utm_term=.978e5edf1de5

Just as the doctor in the story was overwhelmed with having “no easy answers” for the medical conditions his patient presented, I often find myself overwhelmed by the needs of people I encounter in my work, as well as the needs of their family members.  There are rarely any “easy answers” or solutions.  Even with my “fixing compulsion” safely in check, I’m often overwhelmed by the level of need, the urgency of those needs, and the lack of obvious answers.

“We forget to ask patients what they want from their care. What are <i>their</i> goals?”

I’d like to think we already do that…but do we?  And how often is it the last thing we ask, rather than the first?

Isn’t this the question we should be asking every person we support, as well as their family members?  How might our services, our supports, our “solutions” look different?

Thinking out loud here…and welcoming the conversation.

 

April 7, 2017 at 6:16 pm

Wow, powerful article. And a simple first step- What are your goals for…?  Thank you for the thought provoking read.